Why some fashion brands don’t make plus size clothing

Why some fashion brands don’t make plus size clothing

Earlier this month, Topshop had people rejoicing when they announced that they’d be selling half sizes in some of their jeans. However, last week, plus size activist Callie Thorpe questioned why Topshop ‘will go as far to make clothing for people who can already find clothes in their size across the high street, but won’t make plus size clothes above a 16’.

Size matters: New companies provide stylish clothing to women in expanding big, tall market

Size matters: New companies provide stylish clothing to women in expanding big, tall market

Fashion designers are influenced by what they see on the street – and, increasingly, by the size of the people on the street. Full-figured celebrities like Serena Williams, Ashley Graham and Kim Kardashian are embracing their curves, body acceptance campaigns are on the rise, and the average American woman is growing, too – from a size 14 in 2010 to a size 16-18 today, according to a 2016 study by Washington State University researchers.

Nonwhite, plus-size and trans models just had their most visible Fashion Month ever

“Casting a racially diverse runway is finally becoming the norm”

Fashion is taking diversity seriously. That’s what you can glean when you read the Fashion Spot’ s latest diversity report, which took upon the gargantuan task of counting all the models of color, plus-size models, transgender models and models older than 50 at shows during Fashion Month, which is comprised of New York Fashion Week, London Fashion Week, Milan Fashion Week and Paris Fashion Week.

The untold story behind ‘Mode’ magazine, the ‘Vogue’ for plus-size women in the ’90s

The untold story behind ‘Mode’ magazine, the ‘Vogue’ for plus-size women in the ’90s

Imagine this: An issue of Vogue with a plus-size model alone on the cover. Inside, there are only ads featuring plus-size women. The editorials, which are high-fashion and shot in exotic locations, are filled with plus-size women as well. Ads are from designers and brands that cater to women who are a size 12 or larger.

Size does matter – finding success with curve fashion

Size does matter – finding success with curve fashion

Over the past few years, curve clothing has become an increasingly dynamic sector of fashion retail, writes eBay’s Lorna Dunne. In fact, according to the report “What Britain Wears: Niche Clothing 2017”, UK expenditure in the plus-size market has grown by almost £800m since 2012, and is predicted to account for 20% of womenswear spend this year.

A fashion exec gave her unfiltered view of plus-size customers — and it’s repulsive

According to one luxury brand executive, making a plus-size line is the same thing as making a line promoting anorexia.

In an interview with Glossy, one luxury bigwig literally said the reason they don’t produce plus-size clothes is simply because they don’t want to promote an “unhealthy” image. “Being overweight is not very healthy, so it doesn’t matter how much of the population is fat; it’s not a healthy image to be putting out there,” she said.

Meet The ‘Fat Femme Sisters’ Unapologetically Celebrating Body Positivity In Style

Meet The ‘Fat Femme Sisters’ Unapologetically Celebrating Body Positivity In Style

Whether it’s model Ashley Graham teaching the world to love cellulite, Iskra Lawrence sharing her top tips on how to avoid ‘body blame’ or the Enter Fat Girls Travelling Instagram account eliminating body stereotypes, we can’t get enough of women promoting body positivity and self-love.